Sao Tome and Principe 2015

Sao Tome and Principe Capital City

Yearbook 2015

Sao Tome and Principe 2015

São Tomé and Príncipe. In October, São Tomé and Príncipe signed an agreement with the Chinese company China Harbor Engineering Company Ltd (CHEC) on the construction of a deep-sea port on the island of São Tomé. The port will be designed and built by CHEC and is scheduled to be completed in 2019. According to COUNTRYAAH, Sao Tome is the capital of Sao Tome and Principe which is located in Central Africa. A first phase is planned to be completed in 2018. The same month, the country hosted STeP IN 2015, an international conference in London with the aim of attracting international investors to the kingdom. In addition to the presence of Prime Minister Patrice Trovoada, the event was helped by Nigeria’s President Olusegun Obasanjo, who compared the country to a lion kid on the way to growing up.

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Sao Tome and Principe Capital City

History. – The stability of the small island state, independent since July 1975, was repeatedly endangered by coup attempts in 1978, 1980 and, with more serious consequences, in March 1988. M. Pinto da Costa, the president of the independence, the government structure changed several times: the office of head of government was restored in 1988 and was occupied by C. Rocha da Costa. After a first phase inspired, albeit without ideological rigidity, by socialism, with a preference for the alliance with the countries of the East, in 1985-86 a profound reform was carried out, which led to the abandonment of statism in many sectors of the economy, opening up the islands to tourism and encouraging foreign capital. From 1977 there was a presence of Angolan troops and Cuban and Soviet advisers;  The Soviet Union also enjoyed military facilities. Military assistance agreements were signed with the US in 1985 and with Portugal in 1987, more balancing a non-aligned foreign policy. In 1989 the regime decided to abandon Marxism as an official ideology and announced further democratization following the revision of the Constitution. The transition to multi-partyism was sanctioned by a constitutional referendum in 1990. Until then, the National Assembly had been elected every five years on blocked lists proposed by the In 1989 the regime decided to abandon Marxism as an official ideology and announced further democratization following the revision of the Constitution. The transition to multi-partyism was sanctioned by a constitutional referendum in 1990. Until then, the National Assembly had been elected every five years on blocked lists proposed by the In 1989 the regime decided to abandon Marxism as an official ideology and announced further democratization following the revision of the Constitution. The transition to multi-partyism was sanctioned by a constitutional referendum in 1990. Until then, the National Assembly had been elected every five years on blocked lists proposed by the Movement de Libertação de São Tomé and Príncipe (MLSTP). In the January 1991 parliamentary elections, the MLSTP was unexpectedly beaten; in the following presidential elections (March 3, 1991), M. Trogoada, candidate of the new majority party, the Partido de Convergencia Democratica, won(PCD). Trogoada, prime minister from 1975 to 1979, had fallen from grace and was imprisoned for a conflict with President Pinto da Costa, who subsequently allowed him to leave the country for an exile that lasted about ten years. The outgoing president, Pinto da Costa, had given up competing in the 1991 elections after his party’s defeat. In 1993 there were openings in the direction of a possible government of national union. The change of government between 1990 and 1991 was accompanied by a serious economic crisis with trade union disputes and a sharp deterioration in the trade balance due to the collapse of international prices for cocoa, the country’s main export product.